Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among students of Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

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dc.contributor.author Yamakhakha, Osborn Khasabuli
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-11T08:27:53Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-11T08:27:53Z
dc.date.issued 2019-07-11
dc.identifier.citation YamakhakhaOK2019 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/5136
dc.description Master of Science in Medical Microbiology en_US
dc.description.abstract S. aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) remains an important pathogen, but little is known about its circulation among student populations in Kenya. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, the carriage and diversity of mecA cassettes and lukFS-PV genes among the S. aureus isolates and factors for colonization by S. aureus and MRSA. To achieve these, S. aureus isolates were recovered from nasal, phone and pen swabs. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done on all S. aureus isolates. All the S. aureus isolates were screened for presence of mecA gene, SCCmec elements, while a sample of the isolates was screened for presence lukFS-PV genes on their gene cassettes using conventional PCR methods. A sample consisting of 44 isolates of the S. aureus were also analyzed for genetic relatedness via conventional PCR methods. A total of 231 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 89 (37.6%) participants out of 237 participants. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to nitrofurantoin and linezolid and 194 (84%) isolates were resistant to ampicillin. Resistances to amoxicillin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were below 20%. The MRSA prevalence was 11.3% (26/231). The mecA gene was present in 17 (65.4%) of the MRSA strains. The SCCmecV was the most prevalent, 16 (61.5%), among the MRSA. Carriage of lukFS-PV gene was 31.5% and 26.9% among the MRSA and MSSA strains respectively. The factors for MRSA colonization, the factors were staying in Halls E, C and B (p=0.03) and failure to disinfect phones and pens (p=0.02). Therefore, the study confirmed the circulation of MRSA among a health study student population, thus necessitating a continued surveillance to monitor circulation of MRSA among healthy students. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Dr. Caroline Ngugi JKUAT, Kenya John Kiiru Ndemi KEMRI, Kenya en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher JKUAT-COHES en_US
dc.subject Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus en_US
dc.subject Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) en_US
dc.subject Students of Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya en_US
dc.title Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among students of Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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  • College of Health Sciences (COHES) [488]
    Medical Laboratory; Agriculture & environmental Biotecthology; Biochemistry; Molecular Medicine, Applied Epidemiology; Medicinal PhytochemistryPublic Health;

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