Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Post Exposure Prophylaxis against HIV Infection following unprotected Sexual Exposure among Female Sex Workers at Majengo, Nairobi.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Kioko, Rosalia Mutanu
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-13T07:38:19Z
dc.date.available 2015-03-13T07:38:19Z
dc.date.issued 2015-03-13
dc.identifier.other THE RA644.A2K56 2014
dc.identifier.other acc no. 118616
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1588
dc.description A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment for the degree of Master of Science in Public Health in the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology. 2014 en_US
dc.description.abstract Female sex workers (FSW) represent a vulnerable group at high risk of HIV infection, and sex work is an important driver of HIV transmission in the general population. Therefore, interventions that prevent HIV infection in FSW will not only protect vulnerable women, but could also reduce HIV transmission at a population level. The study aimed at determining the knowledge, attitude and practice of post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) following unprotected sexual exposure among female sex workers. The study was carried out at Majengo slums, a sex workers clinic in Nairobi. A total of 344 female sex workers attending Majengo STI clinic were interviewed. The mean age of the respondents was 33.2 ± 6.3years. The proportion of women with adequate knowledge on post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) was 76.5% (95% CI [72.0% – 81.0%]). Adjusting for other factors, adequate knowledge on PEP was significantly associated with ever using PEP (aOR=8.45; 95% CI [4.72-15.13] p<0.001). The proportion of women with appropriate attitude towards PEP was 62.5% (95% CI [57.4% – 67.6%]). Knowledge of PEP was negatively significantly associated with anal sex was significantly (aOR=0.19; 95% CI: 0.07 – 51; p=0.001). A respondent engaging in anal sex was 5.3 times less likely to have adequate knowledge on PEP compared to one not engaging. Side effects (82.9%) were mentioned as the main reason for not completing the treatment. Engaging in unprotected sex when given some incentives was significantly associated with use of PEP (aOR=8.21; 95% CI: 3.83 – 17.62; p<0.001). A respondent engaging in unprotected sex when given some incentives was 8.21 times more likely to use PEP. The proportion of women who ever used PEP was 65.7% (95% CI: 62.6% – 72.5%). Adjusting for other factors, use of PEP was significantly associated with adequate knowledge on PEP (aOR=9.19; 95% CI, 4.66 – 18.10; p<0.001). Most of the respondents had adequate knowledge and positive attitude towards use of PEP and most had used it at time of study. Signature ………………………… Date………………………………… Mr. Lawrence N. Muthami KEMRI, Kenya en_US
dc.description.sponsorship ignature …………………………… Date…………………………….. Dr.Joseph Gikunju JKUAT, Kenya Signature ………………………… Date………………………………… Mr. Lawrence N. Muthami KEMRI, Kenya en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries MSc. Public Health;2014
dc.subject Female sex workers ( en_US
dc.subject HIV infection, en_US
dc.subject HIV transmission en_US
dc.subject women en_US
dc.title Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Post Exposure Prophylaxis against HIV Infection following unprotected Sexual Exposure among Female Sex Workers at Majengo, Nairobi. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • College of Health Sciences (COHES) [776]
    Medical Laboratory; Agriculture & environmental Biotecthology; Biochemistry; Molecular Medicine, Applied Epidemiology; Medicinal PhytochemistryPublic Health;

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account